Mosaic: Consequences

So, obviously I don’t want the Earth to lose structural integrity immediately after the boundary event, so the first rule is that when you have something solid on both sides of a boundary, they fuse together, forming an extremely strong weld.  Even with that, I expect that the various currents involved in plate tectionics are fairly chaotic, so we are probably going to have a globe-wide earthquake immediately afterward.  I picture it lasting a long time, but being fairly low-intensity and too evenly distributed to set off Tsunamis.  At the same time, the weather is obviously chaotic, so no two bordering cells are likely to share pressure, temperature, or humidity, which in turn means lots of weather (rainstorms, mostly) at the borders.

I may have been a bit pessimistic about planetary orbits.  Depending on how the alternates end up being distributed, Mercury and the Jovian moons may end up merely losing a noticeable percentage of their mass and gaining a bunch of co-orbital companions.  The larger asteroids are still going to be in trouble, I’m pretty sure.

Another thing to consider is orbit.  I’m basically declaring by fiat that there’ll be nothing up there that, now out of contact with the civilzation that built it, will begin to rain down nuclear death or anything like that, but there may be a fair amount of junk up there, since both the technologically advanced and the post-apocalyptic timelines could be represented in that belt, which may cause a debris cascade and close off orbit for a good long time.  Even if not, there may be things dangerous enough up there that they’re best left undisturbed.

Not much going on in the oceans, I’d say.  Big fish-kills on the border from temperature changes, of course, but most of the parallels will probably have richer stocks than the baseline to start with.

Next up will be more on Location and possibly a decision, so that I can get on with the distribution question.

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